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A Florida man refuses to sell his small family home swallowed by $ 600 million in commercial development

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A Florida man refused to sell his small family home, which is currently swallowed by $ 600 million in commercial development, despite countless offers to buy a home.

In the actual version of the Pixar movie “Up,” Orlando Capote refuses to sell his little Coral Gables house, which is currently sitting in the middle of the construction zone for the largest commercial development in Coral Gables history. CBS4 reported that.

In Up, the protagonist stands on Pat when the city around him explodes into a skyscraper.

As for Capote, he has rejected up to 60 offers to buy a two-bedroom, two-bathroom, 1,300-square-foot home from a developer, real estate agent, or flipper in the last six years. ..

The home offer reached $ 900,000, but Capote hasn’t sprouted, claiming the home is valuable to him.

Capote’s father bought a house in 1989 after migrating from Cuba (pictured) and worked double to buy a family house he called a “family treasure.”

Orlando Capote is not budgeting to sell his little Coral Gables home currently sitting in the middle of the construction zone for the largest commercial development in Coral Gables history

Orlando Capote is not budgeting to sell his little Coral Gables home currently sitting in the middle of the construction zone for the largest commercial development in Coral Gables history

The home offer reached $ 900,000, but Orlando Capote (pictured) hasn't sprouted, claiming the home is valuable to him.

The home offer reached $ 900,000, but Orlando Capote (pictured) hasn’t sprouted, claiming the home is valuable to him.

Capote’s father bought a home in 1989 after immigrating from Cuba and worked double to buy a family home.

Capote states that the house has been sentimental since his father died in 2005.

“This house is like a hard drive,” he said. “When I look around, live there, and move around, I remember a lot of memories. I couldn’t find it in another house.”

Capote said he wanted to respect the wishes of his late mother, who insisted not to sell “family treasures” before her death in 2020.

“The house is my soul,” Capote told CBS4.

Capote has accused the city of multiple violations, saying his home has been swallowed by mega-development, and the city has denied the violation.

Capote has accused the city of multiple violations, saying his home has been swallowed by mega-development, and the city has denied the violation.

Capote says the house has a special sentimental value since his father died in 2005

Capote says the house has a special sentimental value since his father died in 2005

Capote has accused the city of multiple violations and says his home has been swallowed up by huge developments.

“You can see some of the debris that has already fallen on the scene, which wouldn’t happen if the building was actually 35 feet high or at least 50 feet away,” Capote told CBS4.

The City of Coral Gables denied the breach and told Miami Herald that “the issue was extensively considered and investigated.”

Capote does not give in to not moving and says that his parents’ memories are dating him.

“I don’t feel lonely in the house,” he said. “Maybe they are. Maybe they are.”

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