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A television interview proving that Ted Bundy was guilty, according to body language experts

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According to body language experts, the infamous serial killer and rapist Ted Bundy was found guilty of three small gestures in a television interview prior to the murder trial.

Bandy was sentenced to death after admitting that he had killed 30 female college students in three different states in the 1970s. He later claimed responsibility for the deaths of dozens of others after being finally tried.

Before he died in an electric chair in Florida in 1989, Bandy enjoyed his deadly notoriety and conducted many television interviews. These tapes were reviewed in the new discovery + documentary Ted Bundy: A Faking It Special.

According to body language expert Dr. Cliff Lansley, a clip taken while a serial killer was convicted of kidnapping and awaiting a murder trial shows how many murderers feel guilty. I made that gesture.

“First, we close our eyes. This keeps ourselves away from the words we use. The second is to shrug from one side. This is,” What It’s a partial expression of the complete expression, “I don’t know what you’re talking about,” says Dr. Cliff.

According to body language experts, the infamous serial killer and rapist Ted Bundy (pictured) was found guilty in a television interview prior to the murder trial, thanks to three small gestures.

Before he died in an electric chair in 1989, Bandy conducted several television interviews (pictured) when he enjoyed his infamy a lot. These tapes were reviewed in the New Discovery + Documentary Ted Bundy: A Faking It Special.

Before he died in an electric chair in 1989, Bandy conducted several television interviews (pictured) when he enjoyed his infamy a lot. These tapes were reviewed in the New Discovery + Documentary Ted Bundy: A Faking It Special.

“But to nail this, we get a little shaken’no’. And when you say positive things, but your body is leaking something negative, you can trust your body. Most of these physical signals are subconscious.

Experts add that Bandy’s self-awareness is to undo in a 1977 clip when he’s staring at the camera lens chillingly.

“Now, Bandy’s emotional intelligence, or self-awareness, I judge high. The conclusion to me is that every time he makes these slips under consciousness, he probably he You know it’s unconvincing, “he explains.

“The clue to us is a few seconds after getting this gaze right under the camera lens. I think he knows he’s slipped. This camera check shows him that. A semi-conscious check-in of his audience to see if he’s doing well.

Bandy was arrested on suspicion of kidnapping in 1975, and police also linked him to murders in several states.

According to body language expert Dr. Cliff Landsley, in one clip where Bandy was convicted of kidnapping and awaiting a murder trial, several guilty murderers are serial killers. Perform a gesture (pictured)

According to body language expert Dr. Cliff Landsley, in one clip where Bandy was convicted of kidnapping and awaiting a murder trial, several guilty murderers are serial killers. Perform a gesture (pictured)

Bandy (pictured) was sentenced to death after admitting that he had killed 30 female college students in three states in the United States in the 1970s. He claimed responsibility for dozens of others after he was finally tried.

Bandy (pictured) was sentenced to death after admitting that he had killed 30 female college students in three states in the United States in the 1970s. He claimed responsibility for dozens of others after he was finally tried.

In another documentary-analyzed interview, Bandy is relaxed and approaching, a behavior that is usually unrelated to those facing murder, says forensic psychologist Kelly Danes. ..

“Bandy is doing everything he can to project a confident and relaxed persona. It’s a completely fascinating attack,” she says.

For body language expert Dr. Cliff Landsley, this is Bandy’s attempt to make himself look “favorable” in front of a TV camera.

“So he’s very smart here, and he’s moving, engaging, and trying to make a good impression,” he says. “If we can help people like us, they will trust us and believe us, and if we can create that vulnerability and liking, then It’s a powerful and influential tactic. ”

Bandy speaks to the interviewer and confidently declares that he expects him to be cleared prior to the murder trial.

Bandy (photographed in 1977) was arrested on suspicion of kidnapping in 1975, and police also linked him to murders in several states.

Bandy (photographed in 1977) was arrested on suspicion of kidnapping in 1975, and police also linked him to murders in several states.

When asked if he was worried about retaliation from the victim’s family if he was released from prison, Bandy wiped out the proposal.

For Professor Dawn Archer of linguistics, this is Bandy’s attempt to widen the distance between himself and his leveled allegations against him, his attempt to pull wool into the eyes of guilt and the masses. Further shows.

‘Word selection is interesting here. “Apparently suffering,” when he learned that they were suffering. This is what he is trying too hard for me, “she says.

“If he is innocent, it wouldn’t be a problem to equate with the girl’s parents and, of course, admit that they are suffering, so” apparently suffering “means he is innocent. It’s the shape of the distance I think I have to do.

As the interview continues, Bandy is asked by the interviewer if he is “innocent” and laughs and turns his head back before asking, “Does this include stealing comics at the age of five?” ‘

By laughing at the question, Bandy further blames himself, Cliff Landsley argues.

After two murder trials, Bandy (pictured) confessed to death row in 1989 that he had killed at least 30 women nationwide from Washington to Florida.

After two murder trials, Bandy (pictured) confessed to death row in 1989 that he had killed at least 30 women nationwide from Washington to Florida.

“That laugh can give him two consequences. One is to give him a breathing space because it only takes 3-4 seconds to think of two sentences. Our mind is very Works fast.

“It was able to give him a space of thought,” he says. “But it also helps his report, and this attraction that allows him to interact and influence others.”

As Cliff adds, Bandy continues to display microgestures that indicate deception.

“When we see a rapid blink together, it shows us that someone is thinking hard. Now we call it that cognitive load,” he says. ‘And again, lick your lips a little. So we know that he is experiencing an emotional load.

Despite expressing himself relaxed, Bandy’s body language suggests that this is not the case, and instead puts a lot of stress on men.

After two murder trials, Bandy confessed to death row in 1989 that he had killed at least 30 women nationwide from Washington to Florida.

Bandy never truly revealed where the victim was buried, causing more heartache for the family. Experts believe he could have killed as many as 100 people.

Ted Bundy: A Faking It Special will be streamed only on discovery + from Saturday, June 26th.

“He said his name is Ted.”: Bandy Trail of a Young Female Victim During the Spree of Multilateral Murder

The name Ted Bundy is synonymous with serial killers after a shy and fascinating psychology department embarked on a murder in the 1970s, killing more than 20 women.

The name Ted Bundy is synonymous with serial killers after a shy and fascinating psychology department embarked on a murder in the 1970s, killing more than 20 women.

The name Ted Bundy is synonymous with serial killers after a shy and fascinating psychology department embarked on a murder in the 1970s, killing more than 20 women. There is speculation that he could be responsible for the murder of up to 100 people.

In 1974, witnesses saw a young man who introduced himself to Ted approaching two young women in Seattle State Park and seeking help from a yacht. They never saw them alive and became his first known victim.

It was the same year that several young women, including a 21-year-old radio announcer called Lynda Ann Healy, disappeared from college campuses in Washington and Oregon.

Later that year, Bandy moved to Utah and attended a law school in Salt Lake City. In November Carol Daronchi was attacked by a man she described as dressed as a police officer, but escaped.

She provided the first clear description and a blood sample from the jacket. Miss Dalonchi also told police he was driving a tanned VW Beetle. 17-year-old Debbie Kent disappeared as Miss Dalonchi made her remarks.

After a while, the hiker found the bones of a missing woman in the woods of Washington. A rough sketch was drawn-a tall, slender and attractive man who approached a young Caucasian woman for help and called himself “Ted”.

Police also pointed out a common factor among the victims-they all had thin, long hair in the middle. All women were targeted in the evening and beaten with a blunt instrument. Victims were also raped.

At the beginning of January 1975, Caryn Campbell disappeared from a ski resort in Colorado. Her naked body was found in a ditch on the side of the road a month later. In the next few months, it was discovered that five more women had been killed in a similar manner.

In August, police pulled Bandy for a driving breach. When Miss Daronchi chose him from the lineup, he was charged with attempted kidnapping.

He was sentenced to 15 years in prison in 1976, and police later linked him to the murder of Karin Campbell.

On December 30, Bandy escaped from prison and appeared in Tallahassee, Florida, renting an apartment near Florida State University under a pseudonym.

On January 14, 1978, Bandy attacked again. He broke into the ChiOmega Sorority House, strangled two women with a club, raped one of them, and bit her body hard.

He almost killed the other two by beating them overhead with logs before his roommate interrupted his banquet.

Almost a month later, on February 9, 12-year-old Kimberly Reach was kidnapped and disconnected by Bandy. The serial killer was picked up a week later while driving a stolen car before witnesses placed him both outside Sorority House and Kimberley’s school.

Indicted for murder of 3 people- Killing two girls’ club women and another Kimberly Rafusch-Bandy refused three life imprisonment plea bars, believing he could break the conviction. He was tried in Florida on June 25, 1979, convicted and sentenced to death.

Prior to the execution, Bandy gave details of the murder scene of more than 50 women.He also said he put some women’s heads in his house to engage Necrophilia.

Bandy was electrocuted January 24, 1989, 7:13 am.

A television interview proving that Ted Bundy was guilty, according to body language experts

Source link A television interview proving that Ted Bundy was guilty, according to body language experts

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